The Neurobiology of Compassion & Love

The Neuroscience of Compassion | Tania Singer Can training our brains help make the world a better place? Tania Singer from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences thinks it can. She’s a social neuroscientist and psychologist who says the brain’s plasticity means it can be trained to make us less selfish and more compassionate. In this video for the World Economic Forum, Singer shows how our decision making is driven by a set of psychological motivations - from power to fear - that can be altered to help us make better decisions for society and for our health. Her research has also influenced the development of a new model of “caring economics” that hopes to work towards sustainability and global cooperation. see youtube

 

C. Sue Carter, PhD - The Healing Power of Love: An Oxytocin Hypothesis Dr. Carter presents Psychiatry Grand Rounds at the Medical University of South Carolina Friday, March 8, 2013. see youtube

 

The Science of Compassion: Origins, Measures, and Interventions - Sue Carter, Ph.D. The Science of Compassion: Origins, Measures, and Interventions, which took place July 19th to 22nd in Telluride Colorado, was the first large-scale international conference of its kind dedicated to scientific inquiry into compassion. The conference convened a unique group of leading world experts in the fields of altruism, compassion, and service to present their latest research. see youtube

 

New insights into brain development: A brief conversation with Dr. Sue Carter see youtube

 

Neuroscience and the Emerging Mind: A Conversation with the Dalai Lama see youtube

 

Centrality of Compassion in Human Life and Society see youtube

 

The Neurobiology of Social Relationships: Tend & Befriend Dr. Shelley Taylor is a distinguished professor in the Department of Psychology at UCLA. Dr. Taylor's research centers on social relationships and she is a pioneer in this area of research and in the field of Health Psychology in general. In 2009, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and in 2010, she was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association. see youtube

 

The Polyvagal Theory of Emotions Dr. Stephen Porges - Neuroscientist at the University of North Carolina - Department of Psychiatry. (UNC Chapel Hill) The Polyvagal Theory introduced a new perspective relating autonomic function to behavior that included an appreciation of autonomic nervous system as a "system," the identification of neural circuits involved in the regulation of autonomic state, and an interpretation of autonomic reactivity as adaptive within the context of the phylogeny of the vertebrate autonomic nervous system. see youtube

 

Dr. Stephen Porges - Human Nature and Early Experience The Early Development of the Autonomic Nervous System Provides a Neural Platform for Social Behavior: A Polyvagal Perspective Credit: ACEatND  see youtube

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